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801 West Bay Drive, Suite 518
Largo, FL 33770
Phone: 727-683-1483
Toll Free: 866-499-3322
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Why Does the Probate Process Take So Long?

When a person dies, his or her property is subject to the probate process. This process can be frustrating for family members, who simply want to get it over with so that they can more easily move on after the death. Unfortunately, the process can occasionally stretch on for long periods of time, depending in the estate in question.

So what exactly is it that factors into how long the probate process takes?

  • Scheduling hearings. First and foremost, every estate that goes through probate is subject to court hearings. Just getting the hearing to fit into the executor’s schedule can be difficult, and then it might take some time to ratify the will and officially appoint the executor.
  • Inventory of property. The executor must create an inventory of all the property owned by the deceased, including debts. Certain properties, such as trusts and their assets, are not subject to probate. Then, once inventory is complete, all assets must be appraised to determine their value and the inventory and appraisal records must be filed with the probate court.
  • Paying debts. All debts owed by the estate must be satisfied for probate to be complete. The more debts that are owed, the longer it all is likely to take.
  • Waiting period. A mandated waiting period must expire before the executor may begin distributing property to beneficiaries. This gives heirs the time they need to decide if they want to challenge the will.
  • Challenges. If anyone chooses to challenge the validity of the will, this adds a significant amount of time to the probate process, as both sides will need to gather evidence to support their respective claims.

To learn more about how the probate process works, contact the knowledgeable Florida lawyers at the Charles Law Offices today.

  • waiting period must expire before the executor may begin distributing property to beneficiaries. This gives heirs the time they need to decide if they want to challenge the will.
  • Challenges. If anyone chooses to challenge the validity of the will, this adds a significant amount of time to the probate process, as both sides will need to gather evidence to support their respective claims.

To learn more about how the probate process works, contact the knowledgeable Florida lawyers at the Charles Law Offices today.

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